Powerful, Emotive Frames

It's not too difficult to think of movies or images that are powerful to me, but in light of what I've learnt in the past exercises, I already notice that I'm looking differently at movies and rethinking why I find an image or film powerful. Bit annoying sometimes, because it's harder to be taken away in a story, but on the other hand, if that does happen to me it's a sign of good quality! If not, I can figure out why the film isn't working and that's a very educative process as well, I'd say. To find my emotive images, I thought I'd first think of my favorite movies and look for images online. Starting with ET.

 Allan Daviau (1982), E.T. the Extra Terrestrial [movie poster] [online image]. Universal Pictures. Los Angeles.  Available from: http://www.moviepostershop.com/et--the-extra-terrestrial-movie-poster-1982 (Accessed 14 November 2013)

Allan Daviau (1982), E.T. the Extra Terrestrial [movie poster] [online image]. Universal Pictures. Los Angeles.  Available from: http://www.moviepostershop.com/et--the-extra-terrestrial-movie-poster-1982 (Accessed 14 November 2013)

This is an extremely wide shot that shows part of a detail of the planet and a huge moon. Elliot and E.T. are flying in between, stressing the connection between their worlds and their friendship. I think this image is very powerful because even though it shows the enormous size of the moon and impossibility of connecting with outer space, seeing Elliot and E.T. flying together brings it all together and shows that there's more between heaven and earth that's exciting and full of friendship.

A next favorite movie is Magnolia. One of the weirdest scene I've ever seen was when it started raining frogs. It stresses the surrealist feel to the movie, although the themes are very relevant to the struggles of human life and real. I've googled some images and this is the one of which I think that it reflects the movie and its ideas most, and the moment when I was absolutely grossed out!

 Robert Elswit (1999) , Scene from Magnoliahttp://rapgenius.com/Heath-mcnease-99-problems-shootin-bricks-aint-one-lyrics#note-1524588

Robert Elswit (1999) , Scene from Magnoliahttp://rapgenius.com/Heath-mcnease-99-problems-shootin-bricks-aint-one-lyrics#note-1524588

I've been watching a Dutch series 'Penoza', which is about a woman who ends up being a drug queen in an Amsterdam drug scene and how she struggles to get out of there while keeping her family life sort of normal. It's one of the best series I've watched, not in the least because of the powerful frames and the way it builds up tension throughout the entire episode. There's a lot of use of POV outside the frames, which constantly questions whether somebody is watching her, who that is, and how it will effect the events of the story. The plot itself is full of surprising events, and the way the scenes are framed correspond perfectly to the tension that remains throughout the entire episode.

 Willem Helwig (2010),  Scene from Penoza I  [online image]. NL Film. Amsterdam. Available from: http://www.medianed.com/2012/03/01/tweede-serie-penoza-in-de-maak/ (Accessed 25 November 2013)

Willem Helwig (2010), Scene from Penoza I [online image]. NL Film. Amsterdam. Available from: http://www.medianed.com/2012/03/01/tweede-serie-penoza-in-de-maak/ (Accessed 25 November 2013)

This image is a good example of the imagery in the series. It shows the comfor that Carmen gives to her kids and on the other hand the worried look in her face. In the background are her friends and family who each are part of the threats and traps she finds herself in. The main part of the scenes are framed in such a way that they bring double messages. The next one is a good example of that:

 Willem Helwig (2011),  Scene from Penoza II  [online image]. NL Film. Amsterdam. Available from: http://s.s-bol.com/imgbase0/imagebase/large/FC/2/9/5/1/1002004013251592_4.jpg (Accessed on 25 November 2013)

Willem Helwig (2011), Scene from Penoza II [online image]. NL Film. Amsterdam. Available from: http://s.s-bol.com/imgbase0/imagebase/large/FC/2/9/5/1/1002004013251592_4.jpg (Accessed on 25 November 2013)

In many ways it shows the differences between Carmen and her opponents, the raw violence in dark against the vulnerable housewife. The standard anonymous criminal against a woman, who although she is scared, fights back.

What I learned from going through these images is that it's not just the subject that makes an image powerful, but that meaning can be found in framing and composition of the frame as well. I hope that by making films myself I can discover more and more what are the ingredients to powerful frames and how to use them in developing one's own style.