Project: Getting to know your camera

Exercise: Shutter Speed

The idea of this exercise is to find out how long the shutter speed has to be to keep your focused moving subject sharp. Of course a lot depends on the speed at which the subject is moving, but as I found out, the shutter speed makes all the difference! It was a bit overcast, so I put the camera on automatic ISO, which helped me to use the fastest shutter speeds possible, while still keeping the aperture wide or small enough. Some pictures are a bit grainy though. I need to work a bit more on how to use different functions on the camera to measure the light. But here are the results:

 Shutterspeed 1/8.000 f 4.5

Shutterspeed 1/8.000 f 4.5

The first one is taken at the fastest shutter speed. It looks as if the image is frozen. Even the spikes of the bike look as if they are not moving.

 Shutter speed 1/320 f 11

Shutter speed 1/320 f 11

This one's shutter speed is already a lot slower, you can see some movement in the hair and spikes of the back wheel. To me, this is a good combination if you want to keep the object clearly visible, but also put a sense of motion in the picture.

 Shutter speed 1/10 f 16

Shutter speed 1/10 f 16

This one's too blurry for my liking, especially since it's just one person in the picture I want to focus on. It is nice that you can see that my daughter looks at me and then in front of her again. It is nice to see these kind of movements at this shutter speed. I can also imagine that this speed would work really well in pictures with different objects moving at different speeds.

 Shutter speed 1/3 f 29

Shutter speed 1/3 f 29

Haha, a little ghost just passed my camera. This shutter speed is so slow, it makes the object almost invisible. It would work really well if at night with a little light attached, to get some more effects of movement. But for daylight, it's obviously too slow!

A big thank you to my two daughters, for being of such great assistance!